77.6 F
Honolulu
Tuesday, October 20, 2020
Research Vessel Kaʻimikai-O-Kanaloa
After 25 years of scientific voyages for UH, the ship was retired following her final expedition in July 2018 on the 304th cruise of the Hawaii Ocean Time program.
When confronted with a jellyfish sting, people often reach for an ice pack for relief. But a new study out of the University of Hawaii has found that the opposite approach is more effective. A recent study by researchers at UH Mānoa, published this month in the journal Toxins, may finally put to rest the ongoing debate about whether to use cold or heat to treat jellyfish stings. Their systematic and critical review provides overwhelming evidence that clinical outcomes from all kinds of jellyfish stings are improved following treatment with hot packs or hot-water immersion. Jellyfish stings are a growing public health concern worldwide and are responsible for more deaths than shark attacks each year.
The fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are critical to the future of Hawaii and the U.S., with major initiatives launching nationwide to ensure that today’s students become tomorrow’s innovators and leaders. Next month, the inaugural Hawaii STEM Week will bring together a wide range of local stakeholders to highlight these critical areas of education, and encourage greater community support and industry engagement. Scheduled to run concurrently with the Hawaii State Science & Engineering Fair (HSSEF), STEM Week will feature events to recognize excellence among Hawaii’s schools, connect students and practitioners with relevant employers and careers, and award local institutions for their work in advancing STEM education.
University of Hawaii community college students watched their scientific payload spin into space today when a two-stage Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket was launched around midnight Hawaii time from NASAʻs Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The UH...
AMOS on Maunakea
Astronomers now have a new pair of eyes to detect meteors over Hawaii using a state-of-the-art monitoring system installed on the rooftops of existing buildings on Maunakea and Haleakalā
The Waikiki Aquarium has become a partner with Youth on Board, a collaborative project with Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in California and Nausicaa Aquarium in Boulogne, France. The program encourages young people to tell others about the ocean near where they live in a humorous, one-minute video. Videos will be uploaded to the respective aquarium’s YouTube channel for the world to see. All videos will be entered into a contest and one will be selected at each partner aquarium as the Youth on Board Video of the year. Applications are due on April 20, 2012, with videos being due on May 24, 2012. “Our oceans are all interconnected and so it’s critical that we not only learn how to care for our own marine life but also learn about the marine life in other parts of the world,” said Aquarium Director Dr. Andrew Rossiter. “The Youth on Board program encourages youth to be inspired to take care of the ocean by learning about the diversity of marine species that call the ocean home. Our hope is that through the video-making process and viewing portion of this contest, the young people of our community will develop a deeply-rooted appreciation for our delicate ocean ecosystem.”
Forty middle and high school VEX robotics teams from across the state will compete in the first-ever Hawaii VEX State Championship on Dec. 20-21, 2013 at Honolulu Community College. The event is free and open to the public. “For the robotics teams and individuals, the state Championship is a brand new event comparable to regional Olympics in terms of the level of competition, skill and discipline required,” said Art Kimura of the VEX Steering Committee. “In this ‘sport,’ the students are using science, technology, engineering and math skills to maneuver their robots in a fast-paced, exciting game challenge to score points. While they are having fun, the students also are developing life skills that are vital to success in a 21st century global market.”
"Training and certification can translate into a career that supports a family, regardless of a person’s educational background or experience."
Five startup companies have been named to the UH Ventures Accelerator spring 2020 cohort, and four of them are addressing challenges associated with COVID-19.
Aloha Bowl
The quiz bowl style academic competition tests students’ knowledge of ocean-related topics, which include cross-disciplines of biology, chemistry, policy, physics and geology.