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Honolulu
Wednesday, September 30, 2020
The fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are critical to the future of Hawaii and the U.S., with major initiatives launching nationwide to ensure that today’s students become tomorrow’s innovators and leaders. Next month, the inaugural Hawaii STEM Week will bring together a wide range of local stakeholders to highlight these critical areas of education, and encourage greater community support and industry engagement. Scheduled to run concurrently with the Hawaii State Science & Engineering Fair (HSSEF), STEM Week will feature events to recognize excellence among Hawaii’s schools, connect students and practitioners with relevant employers and careers, and award local institutions for their work in advancing STEM education.
Russell Messing
AHR assisted in the renewal of the taro farms, from performing water and soil testing for contaminants to lending strong backs for cleanup.
"The team used technology to streamline the intake process and the queuing of people and pets. Now, owners can see in real time exactly where their pet is in the process."
Leeward Community College is one of the nation's first virtually "net-zero" campuses, generating 97 percent of its electricity through on-site photovoltaic (PV) systems.
Travis Mandel
The half-million dollar award to Travis Mandel will have a major impact on research and educational activity on Hawai‘i Island and grow UH Hilo’s expertise and curriculum in the field of data science.
Nine Hawaii students earned recognition, over $7,500 in cash awards, and even an overseas travel opportunity this week at the Intel International Science & Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF), the world's largest international student science competition. The premier pre-college science event culminated today at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh. In all, two dozen high school students from Hawaii public, private, and home schools represented the Aloha State. At today’s Grand Awards ceremony, three Hawaii students were recognized for their work in life sciences. Danielle Lyn Keahi, 18, of Kamehameha Schools at Kapalama on ‘Oahu, tooksecond place overall in Medicine and Health. She received $1,500 for her work on mutated cells in mice.
Girls Go CyberStart
The program gives young women the opportunity to discover if they have an interest in cybersecurity or computer science through challenges, tools and games.
A team from Hawaii Pacific University recently won the Hawaii site of the 2015 ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC), Pacific Northwest region, on November 14. Competing in Division 1, the HPU team 00FF00 (hexadecimal code...
Hawaii college and high school students and community entrepreneurs are invited to apply. They will need to have an idea or current business problem they would like to foster through the program.
Fresh from his success with two widely utilized smartphone apps, plant pathologist Scot Nelson has created a new and more technical app, the Leaf Doctor, for a more specialized audience. Nelson, who works at the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at the University of Hawaii, doesn’t anticipate that the Leaf Doctor will have the same broad, popular appeal as his Plant Doctor app. For many of those who will use the Leaf Doctor, though, it is likely to be a professional game-changer. The Leaf Doctor focuses on the finer points of diagnosing plant diseases.