79 F
Honolulu
Monday, July 13, 2020
This is the first year that both counts are coordinated on the same days, ensuring the data from all main islands is collected simultaneously. It is also the first year that Pacific Whale Foundation is expanding their Great Whale Count on Maui from one month to three.
The Hawaii Community Foundation announced the second round of grant recipients from its Island Innovation Fund, which was created to serve as a catalyst for innovation within the nonprofit sector. From a group of eight finalists, a total of $480,591 was awarded to five recipients for projects that will: increase energy awareness through real-time energy monitoring web and mobile application tools; allow residents statewide to actively follow and monitor the Hawaii legislative process; distribute a replicable exercise and fall prevention program to Hawaii's seniors; deploy a new access control mechanism to maintain public access to trails and pathways on Hawaii Island; and encourage schools to eliminate its waste to create green schools. For the first time, a “People's Choice Award” was also selected by the more than 200 nonprofits that submitted proposals over the first and second grant rounds.
Liquid Robotics, an ocean data services provider and developer of the first wave-powered Wave Glider marine robot, is proud to announce the PacX Challenge Wave Gliders have broken the Guinness Book World record for distance...
Saunders Hall on the UH Mānoa campus served as the demonstration site today for a new renewable energy testbed featuring innovative "micro-inverter" technology. The "Kumu Kit" solar panel system was donated by Hawaii Energy Connection, LLC...
At a ceremony today at the Kona Outdoor Circle Education Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Stephen L. Johnson and the Hawaii Department of Health honored the County with the 2008 Hawaii Drinking Water State...
Current state-of-the-art global climate models predict substantial warming in response to increases in greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. The models, though, disagree widely in the magnitude of the warming we can expect. In a paper recently published in the Journal of Climate, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa researchers have assessed the performance of current global models in simulating clouds and have presented a new approach to determining the expected cloud feedbacks in a warmer climate.